Dividing an Open Living and Dining Area without Building a Full-Scale WallMany homeowners enjoy the spaciousness delivered through an open floor plan that excludes interior walls in favor of a continuous space unfettered by dividers that simply traverses from one area to the next. Nonetheless, the opportunity to embrace unique elements of design to provide a hint of separation while maintaining the capaciousness of the area is engagingly attractive. Here are a few ideas to discuss with your designer.

Incorporating a Banquette or Sofa as an Attractive Partition | Although banquettes are most often found along one wall of a room or in use as seating for a small table, this style of furniture can be used as a low divider set between two distinct types of living space. It’s important to choose a style and color that blends in with the rest of the furnishings being used in each area of the open space so as not to create too disruptive an interruption.
Banquettes are best suited for living spaces designed in a casual manner rather than a formal one. If you want to make a stronger statement with your partition, choose a full-sized sofa instead of a banquette. The taller height of its back should create a clear divider between the two living spaces.

Building a Half Wall with a Purpose in Mind | Since a full wall defeats the purpose of the open floor plan, why not consider building a half wall designed to act as a partition? You can use the wall to anchor a flat-screen television, stage decorative accents, or hold an array of trophies, books, plants, or photographs. The wall should be at least one-third of the height of the room to minimize the risk of creating an unseen obstacle.

Creating a Distinctive Separation with Columns | If you feel strongly about creating a division between the living and dining space without making either area look smaller, consider adding a full-height column to both ends of the half wall. While the columns create a clear impression that a new living space is being entered once you walk to the other side, the short height of the wall continues to allow illumination to pass from one room to the other.