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Temporary Decals for Permanent Style

Sometimes, adding decor to our homes can be more difficult than we think. Strict apartment guidelines, the constantly changing tastes of children and teens, and the fear of ruining paint or not liking something can often prohibit our longing to add anything decorative to our walls.

Removable wall decals, such as the ones featured on Trendy Wall Designs can add artwork, color, and visual interest to any room, for a space that is both visually appealing and a representation of your own unique style.

kid-tranquility-tree-amb1Nurseries are the first place that you may want to consider adding wall decals. Fun animals, dreamy clouds and anything that will mentally and imaginatively stimulate your newborn can be added with the simplicity of a peel-and-stick decal. Children, of course, grow, and so do their tastes. A 6-year-old little girl may want to move from barnyard animals to princesses, and that can be as simple as peeling off the previous decals and adding some new ones to fit her style. Maybe your teenage boy has thoroughly grown out of the dinosaur theme you created with wall decals in his childhood bedroom, and wants to move on to some cool skating decals. That too, can be just as simple.

These kids growing up will also hopefully one day go on to college. Dorm rooms can often seem like tiny prison cells, and it is obviously against the rules to repaint the walls. Sometimes posters don’t cut it- and you don’t to risk having to pay extreme dorm damage fees because your young adult went a little overboard with their duct tape and posters, and accidentally ripped some paint off in the process. Decals can make any dorm feel a little more like home, even when one may be miles  away. Some wall decals even come with magnetic, dry-erase, or chalk writing capabilities, making it perfect for any student.

square-dot-decalsThe same problem goes for certain apartments. Some landlords refuse to let their residents repaint or hang anything from the walls for fear of damage. Though this may be very frustrating to new renters who would like their space to be a little colorful and fun, there are solutions, and Command hooks are not your only salvation. Wall decals can make any room feel like there is new wallpaper, paintings, and creative murals on your walls,making the space your own. Easy to peel off, the wall decals will also ensure your landlord’s happiness when you finally upgrade to a home where you can exercise more of your creative freedom.

Letting your personality and design taste show  may be difficult, especially with the rapidly changing tastes of children or the strict guidelines of college dorm rooms and apartments.Wall decals may be your saving grace in allowing your personal taste to shine through even in the bleakest of spaces.

 

Photos from designwithaz.com

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Lighting The Way

VOLUME 1 ISSUE 6
SEPTEMBER 2011
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Do the shorter days of autumn and winter have an effect on your efficiency?  If your answer is yes, relax. You are not alone.

Scientists will tell us that the gloom of darkness and the happiness associated with sunshine is metaphorical; it rings true because as humans we are inherently sympathetic to our environment. But we are not its victims.  Our emotions are not casualties of the weather. Shorter days and gloomy weather can be guilty by association, but not causation.

Why? Because we are free to make choices that either better our disposition or worsen it. We vote for better, and we’ll give you some ideas on how to achieve it in your home.

We’d love to hear your ideas and stories too! Write to us at feedback@creativewallcoverings.com

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Do not hesitate to ask us about any of the products that we feature in the WALL. Your CWI Design Professional can assist you in the purchase of most of these products and help to locate the perfect accessories for them.VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR MORE INFO


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WINTER GARDENING

Plants have an important effect on our moods. The transition from summer can be challenging time for them. Dry air, temperature fluctuations, and reduced lighting send some indoor plants into a state of semi-dormancy. Others thrive in winter’s feeble light, adding vibrancy to the indoor landscape while purifying the air in our homes.

Success in the transition can be assured by selecting plants that can survive in low lighting conditions. Foliage plants are a popular choice for many indoor gardeners, as they tend to have low lighting requirements. While more demure than flashy flowering species, foliage plants add simple, stately beauty to your indoor décor.

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LOW-LIGHT LOVERS

Dry, dim winters indoors are ideal for Sansevieria trifasciata, commonly known as snake plant or mother-in-law’s tongue. They prefer minimal lighting and well-drained soil, meeting its demise most commonly through well-intentioned over-watering. Described as “indestructible” by some growers, snake plants virtually thrive on neglect, making it an excellent plant for new indoor gardeners and green thumbs alike. Another must-have is for your indoor winter garden is the peace lily (Spathiphyllum sp.). Although they prefer more moisture than snake plants, peace lilies are easy to grow and tolerant of low lighting. The “closet plant,” as it is known, is unfazed by the limited daylight of winter and blooms year-round. Its sail-like white flowers contrast beautifully with its glossy green foliage, making the peace lily an attractive addition to your home.

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GOOD SPORTS

Another plant that does relatively well with transition is the African violet (Saintpaulia ionantha). These velvet beauties prefer bright, indirect light, but they will remain content under balanced artificial lighting and in the gentle sunlight of winter days. New gardeners will find African violets to be both forgiving and rewarding, although they do require a bit more care and attention than other species.

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H o m  e  L i g h t i n g  D e s i g n  I d e a s

Interesting and unusual home lighting options allow homeowners to express their creative side when decorating. All rooms require adequate lighting but normal flush-mounted lighting fixtures are not the only choice for illumination. Unique pendant fixtures, standing floor lamps and chandeliers offer unique choices for a wider array of decorating styles.

geometricGeometric Designs

Designers commonly make geometric-shaped pendant shades from thin plastic or paper cut into a specific geometric shape. This interlocks with itself, creating a lamp shade that wraps around the light fixture. According to the The Glow Company website, these shades usually come in pure white and attach to a simple ceiling mounted pendant lamp. The modern and artistic styling of these lamps makes them ideal for a loft or contemporary-themed home.

>>Product’s Website

cloudCloud Softlight

Cloud softlight are one-of-a-kind fixtures designed to softly light any room in your home. The Molo Design website says the lamp’s shade is woven from Tyvek, and resembles a soft, round throw pillow. The folds of the woven material diffuse the light and make the shade glow. The website recommends clustering them together to add enough light for the whole room or hanging a single lamp as an accent piece.

>>Product’s Website

whimsicalWhimsical Chandeliers

Homeowners searching for a cheery and playful lighting option for a kid’s room should consider a whimsically decorated chandelier. The Louise Antoinette Designs website recommends decorating a playroom or child’s bedroom with a chandelier decorated with figurines of cows sitting on moons, tea cups, or frogs. These unique light fixtures will also appeal to adults with a child-like sense of wonder.

 >>Product’s Website

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X-Ray Lampshapes

Adding a creative lampshade turns any normal bulb into a one-of-a-kind light source. The Apartment Therapy San Francisco website notes that designer Sture Pallarp creates beautiful and unique shades for lamps of all sizes from old X-rays. The black and white film diffuses and dims a bright light bulb and the light shines through the ghostly white images of various bones.

>>Product’s Website

Source : eHow Home


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Y o g a  R o o m

Yoga provides a physical and spiritual retreat for many people. If you’re putting together a yoga room, lighting is a key consideration. You want sufficient lighting for your yoga activities; however, the lighting should also support the activity’s mood.

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Yoga Room at Enlightened Way Wellness Center

        Identification

  • A good yoga room, according to YogaWiz.com, includes lighting options for day and night. Large windows that let sunshine in during the day are ideal for day, but artificial lighting is also appropriate.

        Features

  • The style of light fixtures you choose should match the rest of the decor you’ve selected for the room. If you’re going for a Zen feel, steer away from modern, industrial-style light fixtures, for example.

        Considerations

  • Many yoga studios avoid direct overhead light. Gravitate instead toward floor lamps or Asian-inspired lanterns. Make sure the light is outfitted with dimmer switches so that you can adjust the brightness.

Source : eHow Home

Photo Source : enlightenedway.com

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Designed by Jan Bernstein This time we bring Pendant Teelight to post that we present only for you. This is a Pendant Teelight lamp, a classic but very unique and unusual a lamp that you can add into the interior or your home. Its form is like an upside-down tea cup. This lamp comes with a light switch made to look like a tea bag tag. visit website >>

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Classic British style meets fun modern design with these fabulous pendant lights made from authentic bowler and top hats. Fantastic as a pair just like Jeeves and Wooster or as singular pieces, these classic British cultural icons reflect a by-gone era of imperialism, class divide and true eccentricity. Perfect then, to uplight any room in your home with their delightful charm and personality. visit website >>

black-bloom

Mathmos Space Projector Light projects a rotating image of up to 1.5 meters in diameter onto a wall or ceiling. 
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Lumen lamp is an original series designed by Adam Frank, an internationally recognized artist and inventor. Lumen lamp throws a soft shadow on the wall when lit. As the flame flickers, the shadow moves about organically.

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kapow-light-shade-1

Kapow is a looped and elasticated explosion of acrylic tubing. Best suited as a pendant shade, this shade really packs a visual punch & is a definate deviation from the norm.
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SoftwallT E X T I L E   S O F T  W A L L  +  S O F T B L O C K   L E D  L I G H T

White textile softwall + softblock comes to life when light transmits through its delicate pattern of translucent fibres and pleats. softwall + softblock modular system consists of building blocks and freestanding partition walls in a variety of sizes, two materials and three colours. All elements in the softwall + softblock modular system connect together with concealed magnets in an almost seamless way with the vertical joints blending with the rhythm of the vertically pleated structures. Recognized for its elegant innovation, softwall + softblock is a part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York. >>More Information about the Product

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(ARA) – Mother Nature is a master decorator. In summer, she dresses the world in lush greens and vibrant floral hues. And in autumn, natural light is one of her most powerful designer touches.

Natural light should play an important role in your home decorating efforts, too. Not only does light from outside affect how certain colors look in your decor, it can influence a home’s mood, style and even the health of the people who live there.

Decorating with natural light doesn’t require a designer’s expertise or budget. You can use natural light to create an inviting atmosphere by keeping a few important points in mind:

The right direction

Light enters our homes from every window and every direction. The directional source of natural light can influence the effect it has on a home’s interior.

Sunlight entering from the north is usually colder. A northern exposure will only get direct sun during summer months. By contrast, a southern exposure guarantees a warm, sun-filled interior. Rooms that receive light from the east will have bright mornings, muted mid-days and cooler evenings. West-facing rooms will experience the most sun in the afternoon and evening.

You can also bring light into your home from above, through a skylight. No matter where you put one in your home, a skylight will allow you to admit the full scope of the day’s light into your decor – morning, afternoon and evening. Both venting and fixed skylights will offer the benefit of allowing you to control the amount of light that enters through it if you add simple accessories like manual or remote-controlled blinds. Tubular skylights, like Velux’s Sun Tunnel brand, can create a different effect by bringing diffused sunlight into spaces where you might not be able to put a traditional skylight, such as a first-floor master suite or a closet.

You can learn more about skylights at www.veluxusa.com. You can download a free app on the website for personal devices including iPhones, iPads, iPods and Androids that allow you to see how different skylights will look in your own home. Simply take pictures of your rooms and place skylights in the images until you’ve found the ones that work best for you.

Color Coding

The colors you use in your home decor will react differently under different natural lighting conditions. For example, reds will look vibrant and cheerful in a room that gets sun from a north-facing window. But those same colors might overpower the decor in a west-facing room. Settings with a southern exposure that brings in ample light can withstand a darker color palette that would make a north-facing room feel dark and dreary.

You can balance the changing sunlight of an eastern exposure with a mix of colors. And neutral colors will create a soothing effect in a west-facing room that captures the sun’s fading light in the late afternoon and early evening.

When choosing colors that will relate well to a room’s natural light, remember that the color will look different in your home than it does on the paint chip or in the home decor store. By keeping these rules of thumb in mind, you’ll be able to select color families that are most likely to work well with a room’s natural light.

Image Caption 1: Electric venting skylights, operated by remote-control, offer natural light, passive ventilation, decorating flair and the ultimate in convenience – plus they close automatically in case of rain. 2: Sun Tunnel tubular skylights can provide abundant natural lighting for areas that don’t have vertical windows.Source : ARA

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Read about Gary and Rachel Kapner in the August 2011 edition of

ASPIRE NJ Magazine

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The WALL is produced in partnership with ASPIRE NJ Magazine. Copyright 2011. All rights reserved.ASPIRE NJ Magazine  or to subscribe to the print version go to www.aspirenj.com 

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From The Design Floor

 

Maison & Objet continues to be one of the most important design shows to attend in Europe, coupled with the fact that it takes place in one of the most dynamic cities in the world. Inspiration comes from experiencing Paris and the exhibition. Each year, M&O presents three lifestyle trends, reflected and narrated with product from vendors at the exhibition. Although somewhat ethereal, these trends do trickle down, as we have seen from seasons past.

One trend selected, the most literal of the three, referred to the influence of sports paraphernalia in all aspects of design. ironically, the United States has been witness to this trend for the longest time, so much so it is hardly a trend at all. With the branding of sports teams, and the fanaticism of fans, objects for the house abound in references to the equipment, uniforms, and environments related to the athletic endeavors of our heroes on the playing field.

“Coupling” was the second trend presented. Objects collected to reflect this trend were really a continuation of a trend that appeared last September, namely “Please Disturb”, which focused on the deconstruction of objects. More specifically, this trend focused on the interpretation of ordinary objects reconstructed with a dual appearance.

And lastly, “Private Obsessions” highlighted the most obvious visible trend- the collecting of objects, a passion of many designers and their clients. Throughout the show, objects are presented as collections but rarely make it to the home that way. But for the passionate few, collecting is a way of like.The focus on one object, in all its aspects, created visually stunning, graphic displays.

Beyond the formal trends presented, each attendee has the ability to form their own opinions and conclusions as to the next wave of influences. Most obvious was the lack of color shown by many vendors.

January 20th to the 24th, 2012 is the next exhibition when the show is even bigger! Fabric editors from across Europe and the world show their wares at Maison and introduce their latest collections. If you want a jump start on your inspiration, Paris in January is the best place to be.

This post was originally profiled by Kravet Inspired News

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Sheer Artistry

When Rachel Kapner graduated in 1990 from Roger Williams University with a major in Fine Arts, she was poised to be a fashion designer. Her affinity for fabrics and textiles, and her artful sense of style, had her contemplating attending the Fashion Institute of Technology. She had a change of heart.

Rachel joined the team at her mother, Dorothy Goldberg’s successful wallcoverings and design business, which she began with two partners 15 years earlier.

After all, she would still be employing her creative talents, and through the media of fabric, textile and color, transforming spaces into special places, turning rooms into refuges.

Now Chief Designer and President of Creative Wallcoverings & Interiors, Rachel has helped to create one of the premier design firms on the east coast, serving clients from New Jersey to Florida.

With 14 talented employees, including a team of award-winning designers, the New Providence, NJ-based, full-service interior design firm handles everything from custom window treatments and handcrafted custom upholstered furniture to lighting, and of course, designer wallcoverings. In fact, Creative Wallcoverings & Interiors boasts one of the largest libraries of fabrics and wallcoverings in the state.

After all these years, Creative Wallcoverings is still a family affair. Rachel’s husband, Gary Kapner, joined the firm 12 years ago as Vice President/General Manager, and Rachel’s mother — who started it all — continues to work part-time.

We recently sat down with Rachel to chat about the design business.

What advice do you offer to clients when you start work on a project?
Rachel: One of the things I do is ask clients to clip photos of interiors they don’t like.

That’s interesting. The advice is usually to clip out photos of things you do like . . .
Rachel: That’s helpful, but it’s also good to know what a client has a strong reaction against – for example, birds on pillows, particular colors or prints. From there we can work on what they do like. Another important consideration is to discuss the budget right away. This way, we can create a look that will work for the client’s pocketbook. What’s great is that in the last five years, manufacturers have been producing lines at different price points, so people can get the look they want for less.

Has that created more flexibility for you as a design showroom?
Rachel: Well, it certainly gives people more options. We have an extremely talented group of designers here. We love what we do! Our clients may not be moving, but they’re definitely updating their interiors.

Sounds like you’re busy . . .
Rachel: (chuckles) I have boundless energy. Today I was up at 4:30 a.m. and did some paperwork and got organized for the day. Now I’m on my way to Sea Girt to meet with a client. And then I’m back in the office. I have three client appointments in the evening, and then I’m checking on orders. I’ll be done at about 10 or 11 tonight.

Yikes . . .
Rachel: My husband Gary, our VP and General Manager, is a huge support. We balance each other perfectly. He’s developed a successful ‘organizational team strategy’, that focuses on service  and attention to detail  from the  onset of a project to its completion. Actually, it’s quite comforting for our clients, and me!

Are you seeing any design trends lately?
Rachel: For a while, the interiors in magazines and in fashion were a bit drab and somber, but now the look is trending brighter, bolder and more colorful. Another trend is that people are getting away from very formal rooms, which were popular in the eighties and nineties. Now, the rooms are still beautiful and elegant, but they’re more relaxed and less fussy. But trends aside, what matters to us at Creative Wallcoverings is our clients’ needs and desires.

Who has inspired your design philosophy?
Rachel: Certainly Mario Buatta, the King of Chintz. He’s notable for employing multiple fabrics in a room, for color, classicism, and comfort – but I’ve edited the look for a more transitional feel. However, my real inspiration comes from my clients.
The process is collaborative. I learn about how they live in their homes and include them in every step of the design work. In fact, I pack away the fabrics I use on a job for a few years. My clients often know one another, so it’s important.
We don’t just do one “look.” At Creative Wallcoverings, we pride ourselves on our versatility.

Do you have a favorite room to design?
Rachel: For me, it’s not about whether it’s a powder room or a family room. It’s about seeing a job through to completion, from A to Z. It’s about seeing the room perfectly executed and installed and looking great. I love that!

If you could live in any house, in any place, where would it be?
Rachel: Definitely Arizona. We’ve vacationed here, and I love it. I just love to be outside, and I love the heat. I’d have walls of windows so I could look out at the mountains and the beautiful terrain. I think we will end up there one day.

Luckily for us, Rachel Kapner is still here.

Creative Wallcoverings & Interiors
560 Central Ave., New Providence, NJ 07974
908-665-7997
www.creativewallcoverings.com

This article was originally published in ASPIRE NJ Magazine September 2011

 

 

 

 

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